The United Kingdoms of...
alivesoul:

Eleanor Bumpurs
Eleanor Bumpurs was one of the first victims of Police Brutality I can remember. My family was living in the Bronx at the time near her housing projects. Her killing was the talk of the neighborhood for years. In 1984, NYPD tried to evict her because she was four months behind on her rent of $98.65, she resisted, and was summarily shot twice with a 12 gauge shotgun.
Ms. Bumpurs was failed by the city in every way imaginable. She was failed by a social services system that could have granted her rental assistance but did not. She was failed by the mental health community which should have treated her mental illness properly but did not. And she was failed by a police force that was well aware of her conditions, knew she was a senior citizen and chose to barge into her apartment with a shotgun and riot shields.
No one was convicted of killing Ms. Bumpurs. A few people lost jobs but by the time Rudolph Giuliani took office as mayor her death was a distant memory.
I’ve been thinking about Ms. Bumpurs a great deal the last few days.
I wonder what her family thinks about the events of the day. I wonder what they would say about the killing of young black men and women like Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Ramarley Graham, Sean Bell, Mike Brown, Eric Garner and so many others. I cannot say for sure, but if I had a guess, it would be that not much has changed since the murder of Ms. Bumpurs…not much at all.
RIP Ms. Eleanor Bumpers

alivesoul:

Eleanor Bumpurs

Eleanor Bumpurs was one of the first victims of Police Brutality I can remember. My family was living in the Bronx at the time near her housing projects. Her killing was the talk of the neighborhood for years. In 1984, NYPD tried to evict her because she was four months behind on her rent of $98.65, she resisted, and was summarily shot twice with a 12 gauge shotgun.

Ms. Bumpurs was failed by the city in every way imaginable. She was failed by a social services system that could have granted her rental assistance but did not. She was failed by the mental health community which should have treated her mental illness properly but did not. And she was failed by a police force that was well aware of her conditions, knew she was a senior citizen and chose to barge into her apartment with a shotgun and riot shields.

No one was convicted of killing Ms. Bumpurs. A few people lost jobs but by the time Rudolph Giuliani took office as mayor her death was a distant memory.

I’ve been thinking about Ms. Bumpurs a great deal the last few days.

I wonder what her family thinks about the events of the day. I wonder what they would say about the killing of young black men and women like Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Ramarley Graham, Sean Bell, Mike Brown, Eric Garner and so many others. I cannot say for sure, but if I had a guess, it would be that not much has changed since the murder of Ms. Bumpurs…not much at all.

RIP Ms. Eleanor Bumpers

sleepy-socialist:

vivelamours:

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (2011), Göran Hugo Olsson

You heard it right folks, the FBI considered free breakfasts for poor children to be the most dangerous internal threat to the country. Literally the kind of thing Jesus would do was the most dangerous threat to the country.

loverrtits:

thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?August 25, 2014
Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.
He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.
And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:
I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.
I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:
I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.
But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.
"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.
"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"
Her voice trailed off.
Angry?
She nodded.
"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."
The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.
But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.
Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.
"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."
We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.
"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."
What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?
"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."
The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.
"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."
He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.
"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.
"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"
Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.
Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.
"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

In the alley, on hot, rainy afternoon, three men sweated through their suits. They weren’t politicians or cable TV screamers. They were detectives working a heater case.

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.
I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?
Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.
"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."
Source
Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

This is truly tragic but I’m side eyeing the fuck out of the author for all the shade they threw at Mike Brown & Ferguson. Niggas always want it to be oppression olympics

loverrtits:

thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?
August 25, 2014

Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.

He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.

And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:

I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.

I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:

I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.

But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.

"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.

"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"

Her voice trailed off.

Angry?

She nodded.

"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."

The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.

But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.

Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.

"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."

We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.

"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."

What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?

"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."

The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.

"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."

He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.

"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.

"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"

Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.

Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.

"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.

I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?

Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.

"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."

Source

Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

This is truly tragic but I’m side eyeing the fuck out of the author for all the shade they threw at Mike Brown & Ferguson. Niggas always want it to be oppression olympics

nellie-elizabeth:

fucktearseatpizza:

dblack77:

girlsjustwannahavefunds:

insanity-in-motion:

romanticizing-death:

sixcatsandtwodogs:

gifcraft:

Stop the bullets. Kill the gun.

I held my breath at the last one.

IT WAS COOL AND THEN IT GOT SCARY AS SHIT

i’d say this is a very effective message

Reblogging again.

Whoa!

..

Yikes

liz-pls:

I’m only sharing tweets for those who are not on twitter and can’t see how passionate and outraged journalists are as they tweet from #Ferguson.

If you are on Twitter, here’s a good roster of people to follow if you want to keep updated.

alivesoul:

Welcome to Passive, New York
As Andy Henriquez, a 19 year old from Washington Heights lay in his cell dying from a tear in his aorta, an artery that supplies blood to the heart, he asked a guard if he could call his mother just to say goodbye. For days he suffered in pain barely able to breathe as the blood made its way down to his groin. He request was denied. His fellow inmates knew something was wrong. They screamed and kicked doors in a failed bid to get Andy some help.  A doctor who visited him earlier that day prescribed him hand cream and wrote the prescription in the wrong name.
Hours later he was found dead on the floor of his cell.
This happened in April of last year, New Yorkers are just hearing about it today because a suit has been filed by the lawyer of Mr. Henriquez’s family.
In this last year I have been thinking about some things….
I have thought about the death of Eric Garner and the muted outrage that followed.
I have thought about all the black men who were set up by Detective Louis Scarcella from Brooklyn, who have languished in jail for years and are just now having their cases reviewed after it was discovered Scarcella was crooked and the silence that followed.
I have thought about how everyone just accepts that Stop and Frisk is a thing of the past and that the rights of black and brown men here in New York City are not still being violated.
I have thought about how slick it was for our Mayor to parade his black family in front of the cameras to get elected and how New Yorkers have yet to check him for basically being Bloomberg 2.0.
I have thought about those who live in the projects whose stewards, NYCHA, last year said they had a surplus of money to fix them and are now saying this year they have no money.
I have thought about how “affordable housing” here means you must make damn near 100k, yet no one seems to believe that this city hates its poor.
I have thought about the fact that this city has the highest rates of workplace discrimination lawsuits in the country, yet no one wants to address racism in the workplace.
I have thought about how gentrification of this city has made many neighborhoods I once loved and enjoyed unrecognizable and in my view turned its residents into the quietest, softest, most passive lot of New Yorkers I have ever experienced in my lifetime here.
Who the fuck are you people?
There will be very little outrage over Mr. Henriquez’s death. This lot of New Yorkers would be more outraged if you kicked a cat than if you choked a young black man to death or allowed one to internally bleed to death on the floor of a jail cell.

alivesoul:

Welcome to Passive, New York

As Andy Henriquez, a 19 year old from Washington Heights lay in his cell dying from a tear in his aorta, an artery that supplies blood to the heart, he asked a guard if he could call his mother just to say goodbye. For days he suffered in pain barely able to breathe as the blood made its way down to his groin. He request was denied. His fellow inmates knew something was wrong. They screamed and kicked doors in a failed bid to get Andy some help.

A doctor who visited him earlier that day prescribed him hand cream and wrote the prescription in the wrong name.

Hours later he was found dead on the floor of his cell.

This happened in April of last year, New Yorkers are just hearing about it today because a suit has been filed by the lawyer of Mr. Henriquez’s family.

In this last year I have been thinking about some things….

I have thought about the death of Eric Garner and the muted outrage that followed.

I have thought about all the black men who were set up by Detective Louis Scarcella from Brooklyn, who have languished in jail for years and are just now having their cases reviewed after it was discovered Scarcella was crooked and the silence that followed.

I have thought about how everyone just accepts that Stop and Frisk is a thing of the past and that the rights of black and brown men here in New York City are not still being violated.

I have thought about how slick it was for our Mayor to parade his black family in front of the cameras to get elected and how New Yorkers have yet to check him for basically being Bloomberg 2.0.

I have thought about those who live in the projects whose stewards, NYCHA, last year said they had a surplus of money to fix them and are now saying this year they have no money.

I have thought about how “affordable housing” here means you must make damn near 100k, yet no one seems to believe that this city hates its poor.

I have thought about the fact that this city has the highest rates of workplace discrimination lawsuits in the country, yet no one wants to address racism in the workplace.

I have thought about how gentrification of this city has made many neighborhoods I once loved and enjoyed unrecognizable and in my view turned its residents into the quietest, softest, most passive lot of New Yorkers I have ever experienced in my lifetime here.

Who the fuck are you people?

There will be very little outrage over Mr. Henriquez’s death. This lot of New Yorkers would be more outraged if you kicked a cat than if you choked a young black man to death or allowed one to internally bleed to death on the floor of a jail cell.

And the rest of us are not treated like human beings. Period.(x)

You are personally responsible for becoming more ethical than the society you grew up in.
Eliezer Yudkowsky  (via blackgirlsrpretty2)
anomaly1:

gang0fwolves:

king-emare:

gottabekem:

regalasfuck:

sweetheartpleasestay:

postracialcomments:

dealinghope:

mydamnblogposts:

darvinasafo:

Let’s see how many of y’all ready to show some SOLIDARITY…

Let’s make this happen!!

WE HAVE TO SPREAD THIS !!! 

Im for it

Yooooo. I’m doing this.

please do this

Okay, but can we get a list of black owned businesses in our areas?  

word^^^^

^please

There’s an app called Around the Way for iPhones and Androids that locate your nearest black owned business’ by zipcode. PLEASE SPREAD THIS!

anomaly1:

gang0fwolves:

king-emare:

gottabekem:

regalasfuck:

sweetheartpleasestay:

postracialcomments:

dealinghope:

mydamnblogposts:

darvinasafo:

Let’s see how many of y’all ready to show some SOLIDARITY…

Let’s make this happen!!

WE HAVE TO SPREAD THIS !!! 

Im for it

Yooooo. I’m doing this.

please do this

Okay, but can we get a list of black owned businesses in our areas?  

word^^^^

^please

There’s an app called Around the Way for iPhones and Androids that locate your nearest black owned business’ by zipcode. PLEASE SPREAD THIS!